What is an Example of a Plane Crash Case?

Miami Aviation Attorney Explains the American Flight 331 Crash Landing

Though planes are incredibly safe means of travel overall, if something goes wrong, the potential for personal injury and wrongful death is very high. There have recently been several crash landing airplane accidents due to pilot error despite the high safety standards of modern air travel. In this video, Miami aviation accident lawyer Curtis Miner explains one such case our law firm handled involving American Airlines Flight 331 from Miami to Jamaica, explaining what happened to cause the plane to crash.

Video Transcription:

Let me give you an example of an airplane crash landing that was caused by pilot error, by pilot negligence. And that’s the case of American Airlines Flight 331, December 22nd 2009 taking off from Miami International Airport and going to Kingston, Jamaica. It was a Boeing 737-800 series aircraft, new plane, one of the best, if not the best commercial aircraft that’s flying in our skies today. As the plane was approaching the Kingston runway, it had been raining there earlier in the night, heavy rains and the wind had shifted. Instead of being a headwind into which planes usually land or take off, it had shifted to a tailwind. As the pilots were making their approach, the air traffic controller actually radioed to them to explain the shift in the wind and suggested they do a go around, and a go around is when you abort a landing and either go around to make the same approach or to change your approach. The pilots looked at the wind readings, they were within the thresholds, they had shifted to a tailwind but they were within the threshold that they were still allowed to land the plane under their internal guidelines and they decided to land with a tailwind. They touched too far down on the runway and had trouble braking. The plane ran off the end of the runway, crashed through a perimeter gate, went over a perimeter road and landed on a rocky beach that’s literally on the edge of the Caribbean Sea and the impact of the overshooting the runway was severe enough that the fuselage of the plane actually cracked in two different places. The plane itself was in three pieces at the end of the accident. Amazingly and fortunately, everybody survived, though with a variety of injuries as a result of the accident.

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